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Only Ask for LinkedIn Recommendations from People You Know

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to only ask for recommendations from people you know.


Have you ever received a message from someone overseas who asks you to recommend them on LinkedIn?

I have and I receive them all the time. For me, it is infuriating and for you, you should be embarrassed.

Do use a recent example, what do I know about your work as a shipping clerk in Pakistan that would cause me to recommend you? Do you think people can figure out pretty quickly that this is a phony recommendation?

I do.

I will not help game the LinkedIn system by giving fake recommendations and it says a lot about you that you have to reach out to someone like me and others to get recommendations from us.

Only asked for LinkedIn recommendations from people you know. They are the ones who could write textured and detailed and nuanced recommendations that will reveal something about you that an employer will care about.

What can I say about this person in Pakistan?

“He’s a really good guy!”

Do you think that would be helpful or, do you think someone reading it with think of you and me as being liars?

I know the answer that and so do you.

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Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different and complement the skills needed to do a job.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to jobhunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Job Search Lessons from The US Political Conventions

Conventions

 

Both Republicans and Democrats have convened, nominated and received acceptance of that nomination of their candidates for President and Vice President of the United States. It has been a long road for Donald J. Trump and Secretary Hillary Rodham Clinton and in fewer than 100 days one will be elected President and the other will return home, defeated and exhausted by their effort.

Before we go any further, to be clear, this is not about politics or advocating for any candidate. I am not taking sides or want comments about how one candidate or the other is a this or that.

OK?

  1. You have to put in effort and money in order to be nominated for a job.

Yes, I know this is a pre-convention comment but it is a fact. For you, as a job hunter, you can get some interviews but great interviews are going to take a lot of effort. Politicians may go through primaries but you’re going to have to network, including activating your existing network and building your network out further in order to walk in the door. I was once told that 70% of all positions are filled through networking; 70% of the 70% are filled as a result of networking to people that you didn’t know what the beginning of your job search. Do you think you should be spending time on job boards or building your network?

  1. The people you meet with will have impressions of you before meeting you.

They are obviously investing time in meeting with you because they believe you have skills and experience that can help them, same as the politicians. Your job is to learn and confirm what they are thinking about you before you meet with them. Your job is to confirm and exceed their expectations. Part of that involves demonstrating knowledge and skills competence. The other part involves delighting them with who you are as a person. People hire people they know like and trust.

Maybe this won’t work for the politicians in this election but it works in job hunting. Be the person who, ideally, is referred to the hiring manager by someone who knows them and you who they trust.

  1. There’ll be surprises when you least expect it.

Certainly, the DNC learned that the hard way at their convention; the RNC learned it to with have few a-list Republicans were willing to attend. Surprises are rarely good in job hunting. As a matter of fact, in my 40 someone years of experience filling jobs I can only think of one good surprise among the more than 1200 positions I filled. Don’t be complacent; always be presenting yourself in a great light.

  1. You can recover from problems in the interview with great support from surrogates.

The Republicans were criticized for a chaotic start to their convention yet they recovered and closed strong. Trump was critiqued to have given a good acceptance speech. He had a good bounce in the polls as a result.

The first two days of the Democratic convention were equally chaotic. It is not common for the head of a political party to resign just before the convention and need to leave before the nominee is installed. It is not common for the losing candidate’s followers to be as demonstrably oppositional as they were at the Democratic convention.

Strong advocates for your candidacy can make a difference with decision-makers. Always see if you know someone who works at the firm your interviewing with and whether they are willing to advocate for you with the hiring manager, just like Pres. Obama and VP Biden did for Sec. Clinton and Donald Trump’s offspring did for him.

  1. Confirm what is expected of you.

Although both presidential candidates say they were trying to widen their following, if you listen carefully, both really spoke to their base, rather than attempt to widen their following. In a job search, your job is to confirm that you know what you claim to know and that you can do what they need you to do.

  1. Feedback shapes the discussion

Depending what channel you watched, you saw different conventions. NBC was different than MSNBC, different than CBS, different than Fox, different than CNN and different than ABC.

Who is the hiring manager listening to and how can you get to them to support you in their eyes, particularly if there was a “rough edge” during the interview.

I remember a job applicant who believed he answered a question correctly and saw a puzzled look on the interviewer’s face who disagreed with the answer. I encouraged him to email his reasoning and proof to both the interviewer and the hiring manager, saying there was an obvious disagreement over the correct answer. He offered citations for the answer provided and was hired after one final interview.

Here’s one more thing that doesn’t have anything to do with the convention.

  1. Ask for and hire help.

You don’t know what you don’t know. Hire help before that knowledge gap comes back to bite you in a part of your anatomy that will be very painful and cost you an opportunity you really want.

 

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2016

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

The skills needed to find a job are different and complement the skills needed to do a job

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn.

Follow The Big Game Hunter, Inc.

Get Creative. Get Interviews

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter discusses some creative ideas for getting more interviews.

The show stems from an interview I did with Abby Kohut for “Job Search Radio.

She cited a few ways the job hunters are getting interviews. They sound a little corny but I can see how they work. They obviously don’t work all the time but, when they do, you get a leg up.

She says that may work 50% of the time. Let’s say she’s exaggerating and they only work 30% of the time. Want to try?

These are creative ways to have organizations take notice of you because you want to stand out and get your foot in the door.

Let’s say you want to get an interview with someone and they’re just not responding to you at all. What you do is buy a cheap shoe or pair of shoes and mail one of them to the hiring manager and say, “you want to get your foot in the door.”

Another tactic she suggested to someone who was doing a career change was to send an egg timer to the hiring manager and that he get as much time with the hiring manager as sands and the timer.

The interview, of course, went longer than the timer and he was obligated to put on a good performance at the beginning of the interview, and it worked. Is now a VP with the firm.

The point of all this is that it is important to think creatively at times in order to get an opportunity

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Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

How Much Would The Recruiter Earn?

building photoListen to my two-minute answer

Q. For someone who took a job at $50000 per year, how much would a recruiter make?

A. Everyone wants to look in the wallet of recruiters. They forget that these people generally make nothing for long periods of time and then make one fee and then nothing again. But let me answer your question.

The recruiting firm, not the recruiter, might earn a fee of as little as 15%, more commonly 20% and sometimes 25% of the individuals starting salary. Thus, using your example, the recruiting firm would earn $7500, $10,000, or $12,500 for referring you to this job if you stay there for 90 calendar days.

Now the recruiter working for them would earn less. Generally, people working on jobs like this are low and recruiters doing contingency work and they might get 30%, 35%, 40% or as much as 50% of the placement fee.

And you have to work there for at least 90 calendar days for them to have fully earned their fee.


Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

 

The skills needed to find a  job are different and complement the skills needed to do a job.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

 

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

 

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

 

Headers on Your #Resume

money-down-drain Listen to my 2-Minute Answer

 

I received  a resume from a job hunter who used embedded headers on his resume.

Using headers is an anachronism. It stems from the days when paper resumes were mailed or faxed to apply for jobs.

Worse yet, too often, the hair doesn’t lay out properly. Like this one, he landed about a quarter of the way down on page 2 because he used an older version of Word than I did.

You never know what the receiver has and how one way out. It may look perfect on your screen and dopey on the recipients’.

Is that how you want to make your first impression with an employer?

I don’t think so.

Embedded headers made sense when people actually printed out a resume before interview. Who does that anymore?

Don’t use embedded headers!

 

 

I’ve Applied to A Lot of Jobs and Had No Interviews!

 

What am I doing wrong?

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Become Memorable on LinkedIn

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter suggests an easy way to become more memorable on LinkedIn as well as being yourself easier to connect with. 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

 

Stupid Resume Mistakes: The Resume That Is Too Long (VIDEO)

 

I discuss one of the stupid resume mistakes too many job hunters make – – the resume that is too long.

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

There is Nothing Permanent About a Permanent Position

Every show tends to have actionable advice to help you with job hunting, but this one is a “strategic show” focused on your mindset in your career.

Summary

There was something interesting going on on my other show, "Job Search Radio," where four guests in a row pointed out a fallacy the job hunters hold, that employees hold.

You see most employers try to seduce people (for you) by describing their jobs as "permanent positions," when they aren't.

Here I  point out that there is nothing permanent about a permanent job and what you should do about it.

The term, "permanent position," is an anachronism.

You see, there are full-time jobs that occupy your time for 40 hours per week or more. But they are not permanent. They just occupy your time.

Philosophically as you evaluate positions there are a few things you need to think of.

What are you going to get out of this experience?
What sort of knowledge, skill or experience can you plunk on your resume they will make you desirable to the next employer?
Think of this job as having a tour of duty-- 18 months, 24 months, whatever it is. How will they determine what your next tour will be with the firm. What sort of benchmarks will they use to consider you for another role?
Remember, just as the achievement you would have if you were to change jobs will be measured by another employer, the job you perform for this firm will be used to measure you for other opportunities internally. Don't let their chump job be how you are evaluated by them.

 

Do you think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

What Makes the Interview Process So Difficult? (VIDEO)

 

This one is an easy one. What makes up the interview process so difficult?

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn

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