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Get an Offer Letter

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter encourages you to get an offer letter before resigning your job. 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com will be launching soon. Sign up to be notified when we are open.

Connect with me on LinkedInhttp://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered. http://bit.ly/jobsearchquestions

 

Making LinkedIn Work Better for You

I discuss some easy things you can do to make LinkedIn work better for you. 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com will be launching soon. Sign up to be notified when we are open.

Connect with me on LinkedInhttp://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered. http://bit.ly/jobsearchquestions

Giving Notice The Right Way

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the right way to resign your job and give notice.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com will be launching soon. Sign up to be notified when we are open.

Connect with me on LinkedInhttp://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered. http://bit.ly/jobsearchquestions

Choosing the Right Job: It’s About More Than Money

Chess

Millennials are criticized for a lot, but when you start to analyze what is being said about them, often, the criticism translates into, “These people are neither compliant nor docile (like we are). They won’t fit in.”

While millennials may overestimate their abilities, they do have one big thing right about their careers: They want to do meaningful work.

I don’t know anyone who, as a child, said to their parents, teachers, or friends, “I want to grow up and do really mind-numbing dreary, work” – and yet, many of us settle for this kind of job, sacrificing  our brain cells and self-worth for dollars and cents.

Part of the reason we do this is that we have been conditioned to fall in line from the time we were little:

“Shut up.”

“Don’t rock the boat.”

“Do what you’re told.”

“Or else.”

“You won’t get good grades, get into a good college, get a good job, or be able to hold on to a job.”

Millennials were conditioned differently, thought. They were encouraged, rather than threatened. As a result, they are often mocked by their older colleagues for receiving “participation medals” and treating them as badges of honor.

If you are willing to continue trading dollars for brain cells and self-worth, this article will not be for you. I have written many other books and articles, created plenty of videos and podcasts – you can use these to find your next job and choose the one that is best for you (Hint: It’s the one that pays the most money and doesn’t completely suck the life out of you.)

But if you want to try something different in an effort to recapture some of the spirit of your life, I want to help you. I’ll start by telling you to ask a few different questions when you’re applying to or interviewing for your next job – questions like:

  1. “What is the firm’s mission?”
  2. “How does this department or group serve that mission?”
  3. “How will what I do in this role complement that effort?”

WindowMany managers will struggle to answer these simple questions. After all, they are the cogs in the command-and-control industrial culture that made the 20th century successful.

But in this new, networked age we live in, we all seem to be drawn to communities. We want to feel like we are part of something significant, rather than human widgets.

What Makes a Great and Compelling Mission Statement?

When assessing the mission statements of potential employers, you should be looking for mission statements that contain a vision of how the world will be different if we do our work magnificently, as well as the actions we can take to make this change possible.

Unfortunately, a lot of firms now treat their mission statements like nice little anachronisms.

Here are a few samples of corporate mission statements. Which could you rally behind? (I have edited the beginning of each to remove a corporate identifier):

  1. “give people the power to share and make the world more open and connected.”
  2. “a leading global financial services firm providing investment banking, securities, and investment management services to a substantial and diversified client base that includes corporations, financial institutions, governments, and high-net-worth individuals.”
  3. “a global and innovative network of people who use their knowledge in the field of electrical engineering and electronics to benefit customers throughout the world; who learn continually; who work together closely; who have the courage to make quick decisions; who are proud of their efforts to contribute to the company’s success.”
  4. “Day after day, we are committed to sourcing the very best ingredients we can find and preparing them by hand, to vegetables grown in healthy soil, and pork from pigs allowed to freely root and roam outdoors or in deeply bedded barns. We are committed because we understand the connection between how food is raised and prepared and how it tastes. We do it for farmers, animals, the environment, dentists, crane operators, ribbon dancers, magicians, cartographers, and you.”

These statements came from the firms’ websites.

The first was from Facebook. Its vision of the world is to make it more open and connected. How? By giving people the power to share.

Is Facebook acting on that mission?

You bet!

Could you rally behind it?

I suspect you could.

MeetingLet’s look at the second one. I don’t see a vision of the world that will come about if this company performs its actions daily at peak. I just see a corporate description being passed off as a vision.

(By the way, No. 2 is the mission statement of Goldman Sachs.)

The third is interesting. It doesn’t qualify as a mission statement, but it is inspiring nonetheless. This firm, Siemens, starts with its people in its first statement. It basically says, “We are people with particular skills and traits.”

What is the action these people will take? They will “benefit [their] customers.”

Everything else in No. 3 is a fluffy distraction meant to make employees think they are important.

You may recognize the last mission statement as being that of a restaurant committed to sourcing food of a particular caliber because the company understands there is a connection between food raised and prepared in a particular way and how it tastes to you.

I don’t see this as a mission, but as a wonderfully detailed action statement without a vision of how the world will be bettered by the execution of this plan. Or you may see it as a mission because the vision is inferred (making you happy).

This is why Chipotle’s recent failure was so galling to so many. It failed to deliver on its pledge.

Of these four mission statements, I can see and get behind Facebook’s; I am inspired by Chipotle’s and would want to help it execute better; Siemen’s is dreary; and Goldman’s … well, it’s not even an also-ran.

At the end of the day, if I am going to do battle every day on behalf of a corporate entity and make a difference in the world, I know I want to feel like I am championing something meaningful (a genuine mission) and earning the fruits for all of my efforts (money, recognition, status, power, contributing to the greater good).

All of us, not just millennials, should be proud of what we do to contribute to the success of our firms and the world at large.

And yet we aren’t.

It’s time to change that from the bottom up and get out of the factory mindset we have been conditioned into.

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2016

 

Originally published on Recruiter.com

The Single Best Question to Ask on Any Interview

The Single Best Question to Ask on Any Interview

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com will be launching soon. Sign up to be notified when we are open.

Connect with me on LinkedInhttp://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered. http://bit.ly/jobsearchquestions

Job Search Radio–The Emotional Side of Job Hunting with Clara Chorley

Job hunting doesn’t have to be hard, difficult or painful or take so long. Usually, on the show, we discuss discuss strategies and tactics.

In this interview with Clara Chorley, the author of “T.U.R.N.: 4 Steps to Clarity in Your Life and Career,” we discuss the emotional side of job hunting.

 

Listen to the Podcast

 

Also in iTunes, Stitcher, TuneIn and others

 

Do you really think employers are trying to help you? You already know you can’t trust recruiters—they tell as they think you need to know to take the job they after representing so they collect their payday.

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com is there to change that with great advice for job hunters—videos, my books and guides to job hunting, podcasts, articles, PLUS a community for you to ask questions of PLUS the ability to ask me questions where I function as your ally with no conflict of interest answering your questions.

Connect with me on LinkedIn http://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

The Importance of Contacting a Recruiter After an Interview

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter explains the importance of contacting your recruiter after a job interview. 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com will be launching soon. Sign up to be notified when we are open.

Connect with me on LinkedInhttp://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered. http://bit.ly/jobsearchquestions

Planning for the Next Recession

I hate to sound like “a doom and gloomer,” but there is a fact I want to bring to the forefront of your thinking.

The economy will not always improve; there will be another recession.

And, if history is any guide to us, most people will be shocked, surprised and caught unprepared when they are invited into their boss’ office or a conference room and told that they are being laid off.

“How could they do this to me,” Bobby told me as I interviewed him for a new job with a client of mine shortly after he was fired. “I gave so much to them! I was a top performer. Everyone liked me. My manager told me just last week how valuable I was! How could they lay me off?”

Bobby was out of work for 8 months in 2002 after being fired after the recession that occurred after 9/11. He was back on the phone with me in 2009 after being laid off from the financial firm he worked for laid him off as a result of the financial crisis that affected the world from 2007 – 2010.

“I made a mistake,” he said. “I focused on doing a great job for my firm and I did great work for them. When the crisis hit, I should have realized what the old song said. ‘You don’t need a weatherman to know which way the wind is blowing.’”

If that sounds or feels familiar to you, if that is what you are doing, you are like most people right now who are putting in enormous amounts of time to doing their jobs and very little to managing their careers.

The good news is that we have hit that recession yet and you do have time to prepare. Here are several things that you can do now to prepare yourself before the next economic crisis hits.

  1. Start keeping an eye on the weather Pay attention to trends in your industry that may affect your employer. Last time, the largest firms in the world laid off hundreds of thousands of people or sold themselves to other companies who laid off hundreds of thousands of people. Why would it be any different next time?
  2. Start a side hustle. Starting a business on the side can be as easy as launching a website about something you love, selling accounting services to small businesses in your city or tutoring students about subjects that you have expertise in. There are millions of possible side businesses that you could start that, if times became difficult, could afford you full time income to tide you over.
  3. Reduce your expenses and create a budget. Having more money in the bank will allow you to hold out for a great job and not just the first thing that comes along. You don’t have to feel desperate when your interviewing; employers can smell desperation sitting opposite them on an interview. That can cost you money during the negotiation and sometimes even the entire opportunity. It reminds me of debriefing an employer after an interview when they asked me, “She seems so desperate. What’s wrong with her?”
  4. Write your resume now. I know. You are not looking for a job now. However, it is a lot harder to write a resume when you are upset and/or scared. Start by writing down everything you’ve accomplished since joining your current firm. Include the money that you help them earn and the money that you help them save. Companies like to see metrics like that in a resume. Write an update to it every three months. Even if you are not laid off, you will be prepared when you have your next review with your boss or when a recruiter contacts you about a new opportunity that piques your interest.
  5. Update your LinkedIn profile. Make sure what is in your LinkedIn profile is consistent with what is in your resume. When you decide you want to look for a job, put your email address and phone number in the summary area of your profile; this will make it easier for recruiters to contact you without spending an inMail to reach you.
  6. Reconnect with former colleagues and friends and say, “Hi!” Periodic, “hi, how are you,” phone calls when you don’t need anything from someone go a long way toward reestablishing your network. You may need these people in the future . . . And they may need you, too.
  7. When your boss says, “you have nothing to worry about,” ask yourself this question. What do they really know? Most of you work for people who are so far down the food chain they are in no different a boat then you are. Their optimism can be tragic for you and for them. Maintain a level head and make wise decisions without undue influence.
  8. Start turning yourself into a celebrity, if possible. People who were well known in their field because they are public speakers at conferences, bloggers or podcasters about their industry or field or quoted in the media stand out and have a competitive advantage. Years ago, I coach someone who I encouraged to become a conference speaker and start writing for trade publications. Soon he was approached by executive search firms for higher level positions, eventually making partner and one of the large management consulting firms. Eventually, he started his own business and turned it into a very successful endeavor that he eventually sold. This all happened because he became much more visible professionally at conferences.

 

Using a football analogy, we are probably in the fourth quarter of the game and the clock is running down. When it gets to the two-minute warning, it will probably be too late to put a successful plan in place to head off the impact of the next economic crisis.

If I’m wrong, you save some money, prepared for your next salary review, reconnected with some old friends and colleagues, started a side business and put the money aside for your retirement and become well known as a professional in your field. Not bad.

If I’m right, you are much better prepared than anyone else you know and to provide you with a huge advantage.

That doesn’t feel particularly gloomy!

 

© The Big Game Hunter, Inc. Asheville, NC  2016

 

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter is a career coach and professional recruiter with more than 40 years of experience. His new site, JobSearchCoachingHQ.com, is launching May 17, 2016 and will provide coaching to job hunters and hundreds of pieces of information to help job hunters be more successful with their search.

 

How Long Will it Take to Make a Significant Contribution

I explain how to answer this interview question.

 

Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

JobSearchCoachingHQ.com will be launching soon. Sign up to be notified when we are open.

Connect with me on LinkedInhttp://bit.ly/thebiggamehunter

Want to ask me questions via phone, Skype or Facetime? Have your job search questions answered. http://bit.ly/jobsearchquestions

How to Get Better at Interviewing, Networking . . . or Anything for That Matter! (VIDEO)

 

I discuss a proven technique for getting better at interviewing, networking or anything!

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Jeff Altman, The Big Game Hunter has been a career coach and recruiter for what seems like one hundred years.

Follow him at The Big Game Hunter, Inc. on LinkedIn for more articles, videos and podcasts than what are offered here and jobs he is recruiting for.

Visit www.TheBigGameHunter.us. There’s a lot more advice there.

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